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Bare Root Plant Guides

Bare root plants can be a great, cost-effective option for many people. We often find less experienced gardeners can be put off buying bare root because they are unsure exactly what bare root plants are, why they are a good choice, which plants are available in bare root, when and where to plant. We've put together a collection of guides to take the mystery out of bare root plants, persuade budding gardeners that they could be a good choice (value for money, speed of establishment and being environmentally friendly are just a few of the benefits) and encourage more gardeners to choose to buy bare root.

 

What are bare root plants

What are bare root plants?

Bare root plants are plants which have been nurtured on the nursery in the open ground and are supplied with no soil around the roots. Learn more about what nurseries mean by bare root plants and how they differ to containerised and root balled plants.

 

Types of plants available as bare root

Which plants are available bare root?

This guide runs through the types of plant can be grown as bare root plants during the dormancy period between November and March, covering hedging, shrubs, trees, roses, perennials, fruit bushes and canes and fruit trees.

 

How to grow bare root plants

How to plant and grow bare root plants

Step-by-step guide on how to plant and grow bare root hedging, shrubs and trees, covering when to plant, caring for your plants after taking delivery, preparing the ground, planting, backfilling, feeding, mulching, staking taller trees and aftercare.

 

Frost on leaf button

When to buy bare root plants?

Bare root plants are available during the dormancy period between November and March. Some online garden centres will accept pre-orders from around July or August onwards, in case you are very well prepared and planning ahead.

 

Soil in hand

Where to plant bare root plants?

Bare root plants can be grown in exactly the same site and situation as the same variety of plant grown in a container. 'Bare root' just describes how the plant is supplied - with no soil around the roots, rather than with compost around the roots in a pot.

 

Why choose bare root plants

Why choose bare root plants?

Bare root plants can be a great, cost-effective option for many people. We often find less experienced gardeners can be put off buying bare root because they are unsure about the benefits, including value for money, speed of establishment and being environmentally friendly (no plastic pots).

 

 

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